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269-3825

Marijuana Grow Operation

On November 24, 2018, Deputies Jim Doss and Darrell Wills were dispatched by Sheriff Lance Bonds to conduct a welfare check on an individual at 4906 Hwy. 5 south in Stone County.  After arriving at the residence, Deputy Doss was invited inside the residence by an individual known by law enforcement.  This individual asked Deputy Doss to "look at the marijuana plants."

Deputy Doss observed a marijuana grow operation inside the residence, as well as marijuana growing outside the residence.  Narcotics Investigator McGilton was immediately contacted, and responded to the scene.  A search warrant was secured by investigators, at which time a search was conducted.  While at the residence, Michael Garner, the suspect in this case arrived at the residence.  Garner was detained and taken into custody at the doorway of the residence.  Located inside the residence was a 4 X 6 room used for the manufacture of marijuana.

While inside the residence, investigators located numerous marijuana plants, LED heat lamp Grow lights, thermometers, water, fans and chemicals.  Outside the grow room, investigators located marijuana trimming scissors, cases of jars and a plastic tote containing numerous jars of finished product (marijuana) that had names of strands labeled on them.

Michael David Garner was placed in custody and turned over to Detention Center Administrator Kirk Green for booking and detention.  Garner's bond was set at $10,000.00.  He is currently being held at the Stone County Detention Center.  He is scheduled for Circuit Court on December 11, 2018.

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Justin Guy Arrest

Sheriff Lance Bonds states that on May 29, 2018, Dispatch received a 911 call of a single car roll over at 540 Big Springs Rd. Deputy arrived on scene and subject was standing over what appeared to be a victim of the accident. The 1st Responders told the deputy that Subject was trying to get the injured person up. During the process of first responders helping the injured subject on the ground, Mr. Justin Guy pushed on the emergency workers who are both over 60 years old. The deputy was familiar with the subject from a previous incident having occurred in Stone County in March 2018. From that incident, the deputy had prior knowledge that the subject was a felon. The deputy was able to get the subject moved away and he stated that he was driving the vehicle. He continued by saying that he was going to get a DWI. The deputy attempted to place him under arrest as he began to make threats to the first responders and the deputy. The subject made threats and continued resisting. Additional Deputies arrived on scene and he was placed in the back of the patrol vehicle. The subject still resisting arrest kicked the glass out of the passenger rear vehicle. Guy then crawled over the back seat and grabbed a shotgun. Deputies responded by pulling their duty weapons and wrestling the shot gun away from Guy. Deputies were able get him back in the rear seat. He continued making threats and exhibited behavior of being under the influence of narcotics. The subject stated that he had enough guns at his house to kill all of the deputies. Mr. Guy singled out two deputies with his threats saying “ I will kill you and your entire family.” And “I will disembowel that guy.” He kept stating to deputies that he will kill all of their family members and there is nowhere to hide.

 

Following Mr. Guy’s transport to jail, a search warrant was executed on his residence where a firearm and ammunition was recovered. Mr. Guy’s behavior in his cell was destructive. He flooded his cell damaged the fire sprinkler and continuously hit the walls, door and ceiling with his feet and fist. Guy was incarcerated awaiting formal charges.

 

On May 30, 2018, Prosecuting Attorney Holly Meyer formally charged Guy with:

 

AGGRAVATED ASSAULT  (A.C.A. § 5-13-204(a)(1)(2)(b)

 

BATTERY IN THE SECOND DEGREE (A.C.A. § 5-13-202(a)(3)(B)(i)(C)(E)(iv)(b)

 

TERRORISTIC THREATENING.  (A.C.A. § 5-13-301(a)(1)(A)

 

OBSTRUCTION OR INTERFERENCE WITH EMERGENCY MEDICAL PERSONNEL OR FIRST

RESPONDER.  (A.C.A. § 5-60-123(a)(1)(2)(b)(c)

 

POSSESSION OF FIREARMS BY CERTAIN PERSONS.  (A.C.A. § 5-73-103(a)(d)(1)(c)

(1)(A)

 

REFUSAL TO SUBMIT TO A CHEMICAL TEST.  (A.C.A. § 5-65-310

 

ENHANCEMENT – HABITUAL OFFENDER.  (A.C.A. § 5-4-501(a)(1)(A)(ii)

 

RESISTING ARREST – REFUSAL TO SUBMIT TO ARREST.  (A.C.A. §    5-54-103

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Video Visitation

Sheriff Lance Bonds states that the Stone County Detention Facility has installed video visitation in the facility. Visits with inmates can be done remotely on any computer or smart phone by downloading the app from the website listed below. This will eliminate the need to come to the Detention Facility for visitation.

To set up an account with City TeleCoin, you can go to their website https://www.citytelecoin.com/landing.php#videocall and set up an account for video calls. 

Effective June 1, 2018, visitation at the facility will be only allowed through the video system during the hours posted in the Detention Center section of the Stone County Sheriff’s Office website. Visitation through the glass visitation area will no longer be done at the facility.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Detention Administrator Kirk Green at 870-269-3825 or kgreen@stonecountysheriff.com.

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Narcotics Arrest

Below: Investigator Zach Alexander & Chief Deputy Dewayne Pierce with David and Allen Ivy

Stone County Sheriff Lance Bonds states that on May 24, 2018, at approximately 11:30am Chief Deputy Dewayne Pierce, Lieutenant Zach Alexander and a member of the Sixteenth Judicial Drug Task Force executed an arrest warrant on David Sterling Ivy / A.K.A. Dandy Dave (62 years of age), at his residence in Stone County (Highway 14 E.).

In 2017, Ivy is alleged to have sold a quantity of methamphetamine to Stone County Investigators and Agents with the Drug Task Force. Ivy's residence had been under surveillance, prior to and after the sales.

Ivy has been formally charged by Sixteenth Judicial Prosecuting Attorney Holly Meyer with (1) Delivery of a Controlled Substance Schedule II Methamphetamine a Class C Felony and (2) Maintaining a Drug Premise a Class C Felony.

While at the residence of Ivy's, a second individual, Allen Ivy (60 years of age), was contacted, it was discovered that Allen Ivy was a wanted individual.  Allen Ivy was wanted for undisclosed charges from Mountain View and the Izard County Sheriff's Department.

Both are in custody at the Stone County Sheriff's Detention Center awaiting a first appearance in Stone County Circuit Court.

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Memorial Day Safety

Memorial Day Travel Safety

 

Many Americans are planning to travel during the upcoming holiday weekend. According to AAA, travel during Memorial Day weekend in 2017 hit the highest travel volume since 2005. 1 The past three years have seen growth in the amount of Memorial Day travel, so we expect that this year will have even more of an increase!

 

The following are good reminders as you prepare to take to the road during the Memorial Day travel weekend.

 

Buckle your safety belt – it’s the best way to stay safe in a vehicle and remember, the national Click It or Ticket program is in full swing over the holiday weekend

 

Don’t drink and drive – even one alcoholic drink can reduce your abilities and impair your judgment

 

Put down the cell phone – nearly 10 people are killed and over 1,000 injured every day in crashes involving distracted drivers – don’t text and drive! 2 In many states, using your cell phone while driving is against the law.

 

Be prepared – take a map, atlas, or GPS device; make sure your spare tire is inflated and you know how to change it; have your car serviced before heading out; include an emergency kit with water and snacks in case you’re stranded for more than a few hours; refuel BEFORE your gas warning indicator displays

 

Turn down the music – hearing sirens and emergency vehicles is an important warning to slow down and drive cautiously - you may be approaching an accident scene

 

Keep your eyes on the road and hands on the wheel – eating, looking for CDs, and digging for things in the floorboard or back seat can lead to trouble

 

Be courteous - because of the volume of vehicles on the road, you’re bound to run into a few traffic jams, be cut off, or be forced to stop short - remain calm and courteous - don’t let other drivers ruin your holiday

 

Get plenty of rest – make sure you’re well rested before getting behind the wheel, rotate driving duties with others in the car to avoid becoming too sleepy or distracted

 

Take frequent breaks – stop, get out of the vehicle, and stretch your legs often

 

 

 

Travel safely and enjoy your Memorial Day weekend!

 

Sheriff Lance Bonds

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Callahan Arrest Update

Update: 

After Sheriff Lance Bonds developed leads that Phillip Callahan was in the Beebe area, Sheriff Bonds contacted the Beebe Police Department, and coordinated a plan to arrest Callahan.   At approximately 6:30pm on Friday May 18, Callahan was apprehended at the Walmart in Beebe. The Beebe Police Department assisted in his capture.  He was taken into custody without incident.    Callahan was also in possession of an undisclosed amount of methamphetamine and a smoking device used to smoke Meth. Callahan was then transported to the Stone county jail. He is expected to be charged in connection with possession of a controlled substance, meth, at a later date by Beebe Police.   Initial:

Sheriff Lance Bonds states that on May 15, 2018, Investigator Sean Hickman was investigating a possible stolen vehicle in the Fredonia Cemetery area, when he spotted another suspicious vehicle in the same area.

When Hickman attempted to stop the suspicious vehicle, it fled at a high rate of speed (100 mph plus). The investigator identified the driver as Phillip Callahan of Stone County. During the pursuit, Callahan drove through a locked gate, destroying it. Callahan and another male fled on foot into a wooded area off of Sunny Land Road. A female was also located in the area, but is not considered a suspect in this incident. It was later learned that Callahan, after crashing through the gate, attempted to set the vehicle on fire. He was unsuccessful in doing so, due to the fact Investigator Hickman was closing in.

During the course of the search for Callahan, information was received that he was armed with a handgun when he fled. The North Central ADC K-9 Team was requested for assistance, and road blocks were put in place. The Baxter County Sheriff's Department also assisted in the search by providing their helicopter, which searched the area from the air.

At approximately midnight on May 15, the ground search for Callahan was suspended. Callahan is possibly armed. If anyone sees or comes into contact with him, contact the Stone County Sheriff's Department (870-269-3825) or your local or state law enforcement agency.

Phillip Callahan frequents the counties and areas around Stone County. He is currently wanted for PAROLE ABSCONDING, KIDNAPPING, FELONY FLEEING and TERRORISTIC THREATENING. He has been formally charged by Sixteenth Judicial Prosecuting Attorney Holly Meyer.
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BOLO for Philip Callahan

Sheriff Lance Bonds states that on May 15, 2018, Investigator Sean Hickman was investigating a possible stolen vehicle in the Fredonia Cemetery area, when he spotted another suspicious vehicle in the same area.

When Hickman attempted to stop the suspicious vehicle, it fled at a high rate of speed (100 mph plus). The investigator identified the driver as Phillip Callahan of Stone County. During the pursuit, Callahan drove through a locked gate, destroying it. Callahan and another male fled on foot into a wooded area off of Sunny Land Road. A female was also located in the area, but is not considered a suspect in this incident. It was later learned that Callahan, after crashing through the gate, attempted to set the vehicle on fire. He was unsuccessful in doing so, due to the fact Investigator Hickman was closing in.

During the course of the search for Callahan, information was received that he was armed with a handgun when he fled. The North Central ADC K-9 Team was requested for assistance, and road blocks were put in place. The Baxter County Sheriff's Department also assisted in the search by providing their helicopter, which searched the area from the air.

At approximately midnight on May 15, the ground search for Callahan was suspended. Callahan is possibly armed. If anyone sees or comes into contact with him, contact the Stone County Sheriff's Department (870-269-3825) or your local or state law enforcement agency.

Phillip Callahan frequents the counties and areas around Stone County. He is currently wanted for PAROLE ABSCONDING, KIDNAPPING, FELONY FLEEING and TERRORISTIC THREATENING. He has been formally charged by Sixteenth Judicial Prosecuting Attorney Holly Meyer.


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Assisting Searcy County Sheriff

If you can identify either of these two individuals, please contact the Searcy County Sheriff's Department at 870-448-2340. These individuals are persons of interest in an incident that occurred in Oxley.  Stone County Sheriff Lance Bonds is assisting Searcy County with locating the persons of interest.

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Drug Take Back / Saturday April 28, 2018

Location: Stone County Sheriff's Department  1009 Sheriff's Drive, Mountain View, Arkansas

Date:  Saturday April 28, 2018

Time:  10:00AM - 2:00PM

http://www.artakeback.org/

Drug overdose deaths are the leading cause of accidental deaths in the U.S., surpassing vehicle fatality accidents by nearly 18,000 deaths! With your assistance - WE are going to change this statistic! Twice a year (through partnerships with Rotary Clubs, Prevention Resource Centers, the Department of Health and U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency) law-enforcement agencies throughout Arkansas host Drug-Take-Back events (a.k.a. Operation Medicine Cabinet) at various locations in an effort to not only to get the public to dispose of unused or expired medications, but to educate as many people as possible about the dangers prescription medications can pose. With many law enforcement agencies, and other facilities, having 24-hour secure drop boxes, some collection sites are always available.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “the United States is in the midst of an opioid overdose epidemic.” More persons died from drug overdoses in the United States in 2014 than during any previous year on record. The CDC also states that since 2000, the rate of deaths from drug overdoses has increased 137%, including a 200% increase in the rate of overdose deaths involving opioids (opioid pain relievers and heroin). Opioid deaths have spiked from below 5,000 in the year 2000 to nearly 30,000 in 2014. In 2014, opioids were involved in 28,647 deaths, or 61% of all drug overdose deaths; the rate of opioid overdoses has tripled since 2000.

Prescription opioids – oxycodone, hydrocodone, codeine, morphine, fentanyl, and other pain relievers – also is a large contributor to other drugs. The CDC states that, “94% of respondents in a 2014 survey of people in treatment for opioid addiction said they chose to use heroin because prescription opioids were ‘far more expensive and harder to obtain’ and that “four in five new heroin users started out misusing prescription painkillers.” In 2012, 259 million prescriptions were written for opioids, which is more than enough to give every American adult their own bottle of pills, according to the CDC. Drug overdose deaths involving heroin continued to climb sharply, with heroin overdoses more than tripling in 4 years.

Another reason to properly dispose of medications is for environmental safety. Medicines that are flushed or poured down the drain can end up polluting our waters, impacting aquatic species, and contaminating our food and water supplies. Most medicines are not removed by wastewater treatment plants or septic systems. Scientists have found medicines in surface, ground and marine waters as well as soils and sediments in the Pacific Northwest. Even at very low levels, medicines in the environment hurt aquatic life.

Medicines are a special type of hazardous chemical which are not safe in solid waste systems and landfills. Drugs can be very toxic for people and wildlife, even in low doses. Just as we do not put used motor oil or leftover paint thinner in the trash, we should not put these extremely potent pharmaceutical chemicals into unsecured curbside trash cans.

HISTORY OF OPERATION MEDICINE CABINET
The Operation Medicine Cabinet event started in Benton after Russell Goodwin, owner of a local monument company and youth baseball coach, told Benton Police Chief Kirk Lane that he was “tired of making headstones for children” he knew due to the abuse of prescription drugs. Benton officers gathered data that showed there was a problem with abuse and misuse of prescription drugs by youth, including information from the Saline County Coroner’s Office which showed that 30 people died in 2009 as a result of prescription drug abuse.

There was just 146 pounds of prescription medications collected at the first Operation Medicine Cabinet in Benton back in the spring of 2009, but the program and education to the public continued growth. State officials took notice and the program expanded. In 2010, a coalition led by State Drug Director Fran Flener, then Arkansas Attorney General Dustin McDaniel and both Arkansas districts of the U.S. Attorney’s Office launched an ongoing educational program to encourage everyone to “Monitor, Secure and Dispose” of their prescription medications. The also launched the website www.artakeback.org.

On the heels of the success in Arkansas, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration announced a nationwide prescription drug take back campaign. In May 2016, the DEA announced that 893,498 pounds of prescription medications were collected in all 50 states, with 25,289 pounds collected from Arkansas.

WHY PARTICIPATE?
42% - that is the percent of teenagers who have abused or misused a prescription drug obtained them from their parent’s medicine cabinet, and 64 percent of teenagers (age 12-17) that have abused prescription pain relievers say they got them from friends or relatives. About two-thirds of all prescription drugs (which also include stimulants such as Adderall and depressants like Ativan) illegally obtained are taken from people’s homes and not pharmacies or off the street.

“At the age of 18, my daughter knew four people that lost their lives due to the influence of prescription drugs,” said U.S. Rep. French Hill (R-Ark.) “This is a serious problem that deserves more of our attention. Prescription drug abuse has become an epidemic in Arkansas and throughout our country."

“Since 1999, opioid overdose deaths have quadrupled. Nationwide 44 people die from prescription abuse or misuse every day," said U.S. Senator John Boozman (R-Ark.) "Arkansas Take Back is responsible for removing more than 72 tons of unneeded medication, estimated at 201 million pills from Arkansas homes. Help reduce the risk of developing addictions to prescription drugs by participating in Operation Medicine Cabinet.”

We encourage parents to talk to their children about the dangers of drug usage, because education is the key to helping us make a difference in our community. We can further reduce the lives this problem destroys by simply educating those around us and by taking time to secure and dispose of old medications.

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Roadway Trash Pickup

Sheriff Bonds has roadway trash pickup in full swing throughout Stone County.  Sheriff Bonds wants to remind everyone to watch for road crews and slow your speed for safety reasons.  The crews are working on county roads and state highways. 

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